This bathroom is roughly the same size as the bathroom in my last house, so it wasn't too hard to work with and get something that provided what I need.  With nearly 40 square feet I was able to get a full bathroom without having to sacrifice too much to do so.  It sports a decent sized shower, composting toilet, nice vanity with a crazy cool sink, and a spot for a 24" washer dryer combo.  Nice big window lets in plenty of light during the day and the LED light bar illuminates the room very well at night time. 

Had some scrap left over from my accent wall, don't let anything go to waste.  Love the character that jumbled wood gives. 

Had some scrap left over from my accent wall, don't let anything go to waste.  Love the character that jumbled wood gives. 

All the walls in the house were made with 3/4 ACX, plenty strong and very easy on the space saving side.  Since this was the wall for my shower I braced the edge with a 2X4, plenty ridged. 

All the walls in the house were made with 3/4 ACX, plenty strong and very easy on the space saving side.  Since this was the wall for my shower I braced the edge with a 2X4, plenty ridged. 

Back to building things while maintaining the ten steps ahead rule, this big window to the bathroom ended up costing me a good deal more money.  Instead of thinking about how large my shower was going to be, I focused on keeping the window centered so it looked good.  The window kept me from being able to fit a standard sized shower in the corner.  There wasnt an in between price for the thing, it was either cheap (and very cheap looking) or very expensive (and still kinda cheap looking).  I searched around for possible ideas on how to make a shower that I wanted.  I wanted to avoid using tile because of the nature of brittle grout and the fact that the house moved.  I didn't like the idea of pouring a concrete shower pan in something that was going to be bouncing down the road, which may have resulted in a leaky shower.  What I found was the KBRS hard core shower pan.  Its basically styrofoam with a bad ass layer of what looks like rhino lining on the outside.  Super basic, straight forward, easy to install, flexible, and the entire body is leakproof (aside from the drain section).  The only set back is the thing was 650 bucks, ugh.  

Back to building things while maintaining the ten steps ahead rule, this big window to the bathroom ended up costing me a good deal more money.  Instead of thinking about how large my shower was going to be, I focused on keeping the window centered so it looked good.  The window kept me from being able to fit a standard sized shower in the corner.  There wasnt an in between price for the thing, it was either cheap (and very cheap looking) or very expensive (and still kinda cheap looking).  I searched around for possible ideas on how to make a shower that I wanted.  I wanted to avoid using tile because of the nature of brittle grout and the fact that the house moved.  I didn't like the idea of pouring a concrete shower pan in something that was going to be bouncing down the road, which may have resulted in a leaky shower.  What I found was the KBRS hard core shower pan.  Its basically styrofoam with a bad ass layer of what looks like rhino lining on the outside.  Super basic, straight forward, easy to install, flexible, and the entire body is leakproof (aside from the drain section).  The only set back is the thing was 650 bucks, ugh.  

It looks dainty and fragile but once the thing is installed I felt much better. 

It looks dainty and fragile but once the thing is installed I felt much better. 

Again, I used a flexible mastic to set the pan on top of and to glue the tiles into place.  The tiling went very fast until I got to the section where I needed to grout the son of a B. 

Again, I used a flexible mastic to set the pan on top of and to glue the tiles into place.  The tiling went very fast until I got to the section where I needed to grout the son of a B. 

Used a tile sealant before I tossed the grout in, put on a few coats of that and it really helped the stone shine.  Again, I was worried about using brittle grout.  So I went a different grout route and used a siliconized grout.  It comes in a tube and a caulking gun is used to apply it, yep all 1200 tiles were individually grouted with a caulking gun.  Tried to squirt it onto a board and smear it like normal grout, just made a huge mess.  So I plugged away and eventually finished the project, tired knees, a sore back, and a very satisfied bearded dude.  One more coat of sealant and I was finally done with that little bit.  I was worried about how the squishy grout would hold up to all that moisture but it handles it very well.  Loved working with this pan and how the drain assembles and how it holds back water is genius.  Expensive but highly recommended.  

Used a tile sealant before I tossed the grout in, put on a few coats of that and it really helped the stone shine.  Again, I was worried about using brittle grout.  So I went a different grout route and used a siliconized grout.  It comes in a tube and a caulking gun is used to apply it, yep all 1200 tiles were individually grouted with a caulking gun.  Tried to squirt it onto a board and smear it like normal grout, just made a huge mess.  So I plugged away and eventually finished the project, tired knees, a sore back, and a very satisfied bearded dude.  One more coat of sealant and I was finally done with that little bit.  I was worried about how the squishy grout would hold up to all that moisture but it handles it very well.  Loved working with this pan and how the drain assembles and how it holds back water is genius.  Expensive but highly recommended.  

I looked around for something to use for the walls of the shower, I found a lot of things that would work that were cheaper but I really didn't want the look of a cheap wall with the nice tile base.  The white plastic vinyl wouldn't match anything in the house, and I found some shower panel that had a stone look but was way too expensive.  Other Ideas ended up being too complex and would give a very plastic feel.  I went to a local tin shop and asked them about copper, also very expensive.  The guy from the tin shop mentioned stainless steel and it ended up surprisingly affordable.  So I took my measurements, handed them the paper, and in a week I had a custom built and formed stainless steel shower stall.  Simply used silicone to glue everything to the walls and had a 1/4 inch overlap on the bottom to keep the water in the pan.  Takes a little more effort to keep it clean but I love the way it looks.  I wanted to have a valve in between the mixer and the shower head so I could shut the water off while taking a shower and not mess with the water temperature.  I wanted to have a shower that conserved water so I wouldnt have to fill my tank as often in the winter time.  A

I looked around for something to use for the walls of the shower, I found a lot of things that would work that were cheaper but I really didn't want the look of a cheap wall with the nice tile base.  The white plastic vinyl wouldn't match anything in the house, and I found some shower panel that had a stone look but was way too expensive.  Other Ideas ended up being too complex and would give a very plastic feel.  I went to a local tin shop and asked them about copper, also very expensive.  The guy from the tin shop mentioned stainless steel and it ended up surprisingly affordable.  So I took my measurements, handed them the paper, and in a week I had a custom built and formed stainless steel shower stall.  Simply used silicone to glue everything to the walls and had a 1/4 inch overlap on the bottom to keep the water in the pan.  Takes a little more effort to keep it clean but I love the way it looks.  I wanted to have a valve in between the mixer and the shower head so I could shut the water off while taking a shower and not mess with the water temperature.  I wanted to have a shower that conserved water so I wouldnt have to fill my tank as often in the winter time.  A

I wanted to have a valve in between the mixer and the shower head so I could shut the water off while taking a shower and not mess with the water temperature.  I wanted to have a shower that conserved water so I wouldnt have to fill my tank as often in the winter time.  Since the water heater is on the other side of the house next to the kitchen sink, I also fixed a bit of 5/8 vinyl hose to the hot water supply for the washing machine.  So when I want to take a shower, I simply turn the valve on the fitting and it circulates right back into the tank.  When the hose is warm the shower is ready to go, keeping the water waste down and my tank fuller for longer. 

Naturally, bathrooms see more water on the ground than most places in your home.  I didn't want anymore tile, and didn't like the idea of vinyl or wood.  I was told that cork stood up very well to water and had natural antimicrobial properties, I took a look at some and was immediately sold.  I was worried about how it would hold up to daily use but I'm very surprised to see how tough it really is.  The guy just told me not to do any dancing on the cork with high heels, great, now I'm going to have to restructure my Saturday nights for as long as I live in this house.  Its a free floating floor so that means no nails, no glue, just proper spacing along the walls.  It went together so fast I was bummed when I finished, should have done the whole house with cork. 

Naturally, bathrooms see more water on the ground than most places in your home.  I didn't want anymore tile, and didn't like the idea of vinyl or wood.  I was told that cork stood up very well to water and had natural antimicrobial properties, I took a look at some and was immediately sold.  I was worried about how it would hold up to daily use but I'm very surprised to see how tough it really is.  The guy just told me not to do any dancing on the cork with high heels, great, now I'm going to have to restructure my Saturday nights for as long as I live in this house.  Its a free floating floor so that means no nails, no glue, just proper spacing along the walls.  It went together so fast I was bummed when I finished, should have done the whole house with cork. 

I was very skeptical about a toilet that keep all your crap inside your house, I feel like I've turned into the worst kind of hoarder imaginable...  But after a little time with this bad boy I'm not all that scared of the composting toilet anymore.  Its pretty simple, it's a high tech bucket you take a dump in and thats about it.  It's made by Separett and it will set you back about 1400 bucks.  I just didn't want to ever have to deal with black water, but you do have to deal with a bucket full of poop every once and a while.  The toilet has two sections that keep the liquids and the solids separate, liquids drain outside into your gray water while the solids stay inside the toilet.  The thing I like most about the toilet is that it had a fan built into it that vents everything outside... unless the power goes out.  When you sit on the toilet, a trap door opens up to allow solids to fall on through, when you stand up the trap door closes so you don't have to look at all the treasure you're saving up.  One down side is that you cant stand up to pee in it, gotta sit down or else you're going to have a mess on your hands.  When you're done taking a wee, get a small cup of water and pour it down the liquid side to keep your toilet clean.  Built a little box with a 1.5 gallon water tank to make the process easy as flushing a normal toilet.  I know it sounds like a pain but I hardly even notice anymore, bathroom seems to stay clean much longer without all that gross spatter flying everywhere.  When the bucket is filled up, the whole top of the toilet folds up exposing your loot and the bucket its stored in.  Simply close the bag and put the lid on the bucket, take it outside to do its composting thing, and put a new bucket and bag in the toilet.  Again, I know how gross this sounds and how inconvenient it seems but it takes all of 2 minutes and really isn't that bad.  And hey, if your a gardener you can use your compost to grow sweet sweet tomatoes.  And when your guests marvel at how delicious and wonderful your tomatoes are, you can tell them exactly where they came from ;)

Keep an eye out for sweet deals, this all wood vanity was nearly 300 bucks and I picked it up for 100 because it had a small scratch on the side and the door wouldn't shut squarely.  Little stuff that I don't even notice, vanity has nice soft shut doors and drawer and all around looks nice, total score.  The medicine cabinet is from Ikea, nice big mirror thats nice and deep.  It has LED lights built right into the thing and when you open the doors the light shines into the cabinet.  Just a little spendy but I love the thing.  

The SINK!  When I saw this thing at the local hardware store I didn't even think, I just picked up its hulking mass and took it home.  I fell in love with this hunk of rock, and it's the one feature that always steals everyones attention.  Its easy to see that though, is' a simple and beautiful feature.  I wish I knew where it came from or who made it because I love this thing.  Its just a big piece of granite that was cut in half, flattened on the bottom, scooped out, and polished up.  I wanted granite counter tops but that would have been way too heavy for the house, this was my compromise.  Used a leftover piece of butcher block for the counter top and built a shelf behind the sink to maximize the small amount of space that I had.  Had leftover tile from the shower and covered my plywood shelf up with that and had myself a very nice little sink area.  Found a nice little waterfall faucet to accompany the sink and I couldn't be happier.  Pretty cool set up if you ask me. 

With everything being build with moisture absorbing wood I wanted to be able to vacate as much vapor as I could.  Since the toilet takes care of all the gross smells, the function of this van was to rid the bathroom of moisture when I was taking a shower.  I didn't want cold air dumping into my house through an intentional hole so I used a dryer hose to run the hole down and out.  Effectively keeping the cold air from pouring into the house, worked way better than I thought it would. 

I loooooooove old barn wood, this wood was repurposed snow fence from out on the Wyoming plains.  This is the good stuff, it hasn't been sitting in the dirt, its lived its life sitting off the ground drying for decades, and it tells a beautiful story.  It is a little rough but it was very easy to work with and turned out way nicer than I though it would.  If youre going to use barn wood, I would suggest using something that is nice and dry and shows no sign of rot. Simply attached this beautiful door to the ceiling with a standard closet door roller.  Put a little flush finger pull on the outside and a little bracket below to keep it from swinging around during transport.  Very nice finishing touch to this beautiful little bathroom.